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  1. Near & Far: Recipes Inspired by Home and Travel by Heidi Swanson · badufyjuhi.cf
  2. Gardenista Giveaway: Near & Far, a New Cookbook from Heidi Swanson
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Whisk together and then drizzle the mixture across the squash and use your hands to slather and massage it evenly across the wedges. Arrange them in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet, or in a shallow roasting pan, before placing in the oven. Bake for 20 minutes or until color starts to develop on the bottoms; flip the squash over and bake for an additional 10 to 20 minutes, until golden and tender through-out. Remove from the oven and allow to cool slightly before arranging on a platter. Review: The Food of Morocco. Simply Ancient Grains.

Bouchon Bakery. Torta di Spinaci. Leave a Reply Want to join the discussion? Feel free to contribute! Again, thank you all so much for your support and enthusiasm - I'm so incredibly excited to see what you do with the book. Posted here :. Love seeing it get some early attention via Kevin Masse :. It's a spicy corn preparation called Vaghareli Makai. I wrote a post a while back about writing a cookbook proposal.

It explained how I typically approach the first stages of a cookbook project. I thought I'd follow that up with a post focused on some of the details that have taken place in the time since. There are a number of reasons to write one. Most believe it's the step you need to take just before pursuing a book deal, which is often true. You write a proposal to get a book deal. It's a beautiful planet, but not one that I recognize. The recipes are written differently and not in a good way. In Super Natural Every Day it felt like the recipes were written for the home cook and were very easy to adapt if you were missing an ingredient.

Whereas in this book, the instructions were fussy and the ingredient list was much more exotic, which I guess is some of the appeal of the book, being the "far" part of the title. There was one recipe that asked for tomatillos and the instructions said to look for tomatillos with a purple blush. I don't know about you, but my tomatillos come from the grocery store and they're always green. Super Natural Every Day just seemed more down to earth. I had to go back for 3 servings because it was like sipping at brown water. The taste was also just so bland even with all the garnishes she recommends.

I've made better winter squash soups using far less ingredients and simpler techniques. I think this cookbook is in the same category of Isa Does It by Isa Moskowitz, which I read back in just disappointing. Sep 23, Kathy rated it liked it. The photos are beautiful but I found it hard to compile many of the ingredients in my somewhat podunk town. Also, I didn't find myself inspired by very many recipes. Loved the two previous cookbooks but this one felt half-inspired. Nov 07, Madeleine rated it really liked it. If you make only one recipe in this cookbook, make the edamame mint spread.

Near & Far: Recipes Inspired by Home and Travel by Heidi Swanson · badufyjuhi.cf

The recipes are ordered by locale: watermelon radish soup and root donburi are in the Japan section; France has a wine-washed arugula salad with ripped croissant instead of croutons. I was fortunate, for the first 6 months of cooking, to live within walking distance of Korean and Turkish grocers. Some of these ingredients could be skipped basil instead of shiso , but others were critical—preserved lemons, for example, really elevated the dried fruit salad. The recipes are all vegetarian, but they still manage to feel luxurious.

I struck out just a few times with the slightly bland leek soup and the far too weird radishes with nori butter—but touches of saffron and smoked paprika and ricotta kept other dishes lively. Oct 21, Andrea rated it really liked it Shelves: cookbooks , non-fiction.


  1. Near & Far: Recipes Inspired by Home and Travel.
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This is my favorite book of Heidi's so far. Her recipes and photos are artwork. She makes gorgeous food that also happens to be vegetarian.

Gardenista Giveaway: Near & Far, a New Cookbook from Heidi Swanson

Not everything is to my taste. The location-based organization of the recipes was fun. I appreciate that she provides substitutes for hard-to-source ingredients; it gives me an idea of what the original ingredient is like, and a workaround for things I can't g This is my favorite book of Heidi's so far. I appreciate that she provides substitutes for hard-to-source ingredients; it gives me an idea of what the original ingredient is like, and a workaround for things I can't get in my area. Things to try: SF: - red lentil hummus - spring carrots and beans old favorite from her blog - buttermilk cakes - baked oatmeal - whole wheat waffles - turmeric tea En route: - chive dumplings - spring rolls or components Morocco - beghrir - saffron honey - saffron tagine - harira - roasted winter squash Japan - turmeric miso soup - brussels sprouts - simmered winter squash Italy - Fiasco-style fagioli - Eggs in purgatory France - baby artichoke salad - lettuce hearts with melted butter India - vaghareli makai - saag paneer - rasam - makhaniya lassi extras - cultured honey butter.

Nov 10, Mia rated it it was amazing Shelves: cooking. I was provided with a copy of this book as an advance e-reader copy to provide an honest and fair review. Not that I needed to be given an ARC to review this book. I love Heidi Swanson's blog and recipes. Although several recipes call for ingredients that may be hard to find depending on where you live, there are almost always online sources.

This cookbook is more a travel diary of her adventures around several countries and her home in northern California. I am drawn to the recipes from North Af I was provided with a copy of this book as an advance e-reader copy to provide an honest and fair review. I am drawn to the recipes from North Africa but in this cookbook, I have found myself wanting to make them all.

The super simple recipes in this cook book call for using the freshest and best ingredients you can find.

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Take the time to get to know your local farmers at the farmers market. They will help you with what you need to have for cooking at its best. Even if you never cook a single recipe out of this cookbook, it is the perfect book for an arm chair traveler to explore other cultures. The best way to learn about a culture is to learn about how it prepares food.

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Gorgeous as expected, haven't had time to try the recipes yet. Jan 04, Rebecca rated it really liked it Shelves: cookbooks.

Swanson's narrative is one of privilege, it is true. A lot of the reviews at Goodreads have mentioned this, with varying degrees of annoyance. The book, however, does not pretend. The minute you touch the embossed hard cover and look at the photos, you know that this is a chichi cookbook although the recipes are simple , not Betty Crocker's Cookbook or The Joy of Cooking.

The subtitle does not lie: "Recipes Inspired by Home and Travel. The photos of the destinations are sometimes so artsy as to feel contrived, but they anchor each section in its own ethos. I haven't yet made any of the recipes, but I am inspired. As a committed omnivore, vegetarian recipes rarely inspire me, but I find her approach to flavors intriguing.

If you are someone who likes hunting down interesting ingredients, you will likely enjoy this book. She isn't writing for someone who does not know anything about ethnic foods, so you will not find explanations and definitions for a lot of the ingredients. I think she could have done more in that regard, and it was a missed opportunity.

Overall, however, this is a beautifully produced cookbook, with accessible-but-not-accommodating prose. I'm looking forward to digging in to the recipes. This book is amazing. I recommend any home chef to own this little beauty. Not just that though, Swanson includes with every recipe a worldly story of how she came to try the food for the first time. It immerses you in steamy markets in India, bustling airports of San Francisco and truly brin This book is amazing. It immerses you in steamy markets in India, bustling airports of San Francisco and truly brings life to a recipe book.

If you love food, beautiful photography, amazing tactile quality and a lust for adventure you will love this cookbook. Must have. Sep 25, Laura rated it it was ok. Just not my kind of cookbook. The ingredients are too hard to source without going to great lengths ordering online? Perhaps a shredded vegetable with a sprinkling of almonds and a complex sauce would suffice for you, but I need a bit more to sustain me more than an hour or two.

Oct 06, Janel Gradowski rated it it was amazing Shelves: cookbook. Swanson was one of the first food bloggers who I ever started following, years ago. This cookbook features recipes inspired by her life at home in northern California and by her travels in Morocco, France, India, Italy, and Japan. I love it! All of the recipes are vegetarian. While many are simple they also focus on quality ingredients.

The photographs are gorgeous too. Feb 28, Emily rated it it was ok. Quite refined, the tone bordered on superiority. Many ingredients were inaccessible on a normal shopping day, and some of the technical side of recipes made me feel gastro-stupid. The implication throughout the book was that most people can travel the world, pick out exotic ingredients from exotic markets and then make simple satisfying dishes in their pied-a-terre. Irritated me. Jun 09, Catherine rated it really liked it. I've found the recipes to be hit or miss, but I love how the book is structured: by destination, with a list of pantry ingredients for each locale.

This is less of a reference and more of an inspiration to travel, cook, and eat. Oct 29, Lindsey rated it really liked it.