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8 thoughts on “Greenbelt needs to rediscover it’s spiritual confidence”
Contents:
  1. Renewing faith, hope & love in the LORD amidst all that life brings our way…
  2. Rediscover Catholicism
  3. Join Kobo & start eReading today
  4. Re-discovering Jesus – Part 13 – A Fruitless Tree – Hope
  5. A Pilgrimage into the Beauty, Goodness and Heart of Christianity

I agree about the communion being tricky but also that at many of the smaller events, especially where monks are involved, to have experienced some real treasures. I am a Greenbelt addict. But a lot of what you say Jon, resonates with me. Not sure what I mean exactly, but coming back to Greenbelts, part of its beauty is definitely in the pacing. And the fact that that you can take Greenbelt at your own pace.

Doing nothing, or everything. Alongside this, my least favourite part of Greenbelt is the Sunday morning communion service. I think this is why I feel I can be a bit objective about it — I think it has loads of great things but also weaknesses — as all events and organisations do. Like others above, I have a difficulty with the main Sunday communion while simultaneously appreciating it. I have been part of GB for long enough to recall it in the days when the charismatic and even Pentecostal strands were more present and catered for. Perhaps this contributed to the creation of festivals like Soul Survivor and New Wine?

Also the fact that I meet friends from all over the place. Given that the catastrophic drop in numbers coincided with moving from Cheltenham. Further, in the Cheltenham years, the demographic has got older and the Cheltenham site enabled easier access for those with mobility challenges. Just come across this blog from someone who sent me a link. Some of the points i recognise. Is it because only certain people get invited, or is it because only certain people want to come? Similarly with the lack of evangelical charismatics, although again there are some, such as Y-Friday on the mainstage, and Tim Hughes played to a capacity venue a couple of years ago.

When this has been discussed elsewhere it has been said not sure how authoritatively that the line up reflects who wants to come, rather than a deliberate policy over invitations. The location divides people, and i must admit to being one of those who thought Boughton last year was wonderful, as it returned to being a festival rather than an event on the edge of town by a conference centre, but as has been said above others have the opposite view! Really appreciate this post. It sums up both why I love Greenbelt and I why I too, wish it could be shaken up a bit.

The echo-chamber thing is a real problem for me. But I have to say i still see a lot of received certainties at Greenbelt — just different ones. You are commenting using your WordPress. You are commenting using your Google account.

Renewing faith, hope & love in the LORD amidst all that life brings our way…

You are commenting using your Twitter account. You are commenting using your Facebook account. Notify me of new comments via email. Notify me of new posts via email. Gave a copy to another Catholic classmate already! Mar 21, Patrick rated it it was amazing Shelves: religion. Matthew Kelly has done a public service for the rest of us.

This is a pep talk, a field guide, a spiritual work of mercy, and the literary equivalent of a Swiss Army knife. Kelly sometimes repeats himself, but in my opinion, the book's only significant shortcoming is that it lacks an index. I rated this high because I want to support the book It is visually attractive and quickly illustrates some of the glory and genius of the Catholic church.

Kelly worked as a consultant motivational speaker for fortune companies and you can feel the slick, professional style in his inspirational self-help writing. That said, the target of the book seems to be individuals who have overlooked their Catholic faith and wandered down other paths. This book could be the catalyst that re-ignites their interest and gets them to take a second look at Catholicism.

That second look would require seeking out church history and theology in other books. This book just contains brief glimpses or references to that information. Practicing Catholics in search of a serious theology book should look elsewhere. This book is about wetting the appetite, not setting out a feast of Catholic teachings. I have been giving copies of this book away left and right.

It's so easy to read, and while Kelly goes deep on some Catholic insight, he keeps things accessible. I rate it as one of the best books about Catholicism that I've read. I reviewed it in full on my blog, here. View all 3 comments. Feb 27, Michael J. No matter what your religion is this book will shed light on how to be a better person, how to give, and how to be a better version of yourself.

Might even learn how to become Holy! I am sure becoming more aware. This book was a difficult one for me to read because I truly believe there is some legitimate truth and wisdom in its pages, but ultimately that truth and wisdom are compromised by Kelly's black-and-white approach to something as complex as morality and religion, along with his in-crowd approach to Catholicism vs. Kelly hits on some interesting themes like discipline, confession, and authentic knowledge of self in this book, and at times he does so with the g This book was a difficult one for me to read because I truly believe there is some legitimate truth and wisdom in its pages, but ultimately that truth and wisdom are compromised by Kelly's black-and-white approach to something as complex as morality and religion, along with his in-crowd approach to Catholicism vs.

Kelly hits on some interesting themes like discipline, confession, and authentic knowledge of self in this book, and at times he does so with the grandeur and flash of a true spiritual leader. With that said, however, I had trouble even taking the good parts of his message away after reading because of his constant divisive tone. Kelly is quick to criticize, and seems to get away with it because most of the time he is criticizing something as general and faceless as "modern culture" or "people in today's world," but at times his derision falls especially harshly on non-Catholic Christians, which I found to be sadly unnecessary.

As a Catholic myself, I was sad to be let down by a book and by an author so many in my faith had recommended to me as a beacon of truth in a struggling religion. I hope Mr. Kelly recognizes how harmful his words may be, and how, while trying to strengthen a much in-need community, he is needlessly harming another in the process. Very down-to-earth in his writing, Matthew Kelly points out where modern Catholics have gotten off track and gently reminds us of our call to holiness--to be the 'best-versions-of-ourselves'. He describes what holiness is--not an unattainable goal only grasped by saints, but choices we make in small everyday decisions.

He then tells us why we should want it since in our hearts we know we already do, and then how to go about it.

The Relevance of Augusto Del Noce's Thought for Today's World

In the last part, he describes the Seven Pillars of Catholicism. As a Very down-to-earth in his writing, Matthew Kelly points out where modern Catholics have gotten off track and gently reminds us of our call to holiness--to be the 'best-versions-of-ourselves'. As a life-long Catholic, I had never understood the practice of fasting as clearly as when he explained it as the prayer of the body.

I'd never thought about needing to consciously grow in virtue instead of just trying to stay away from vice. He calls for change--not worldwide, but in each of our small lives that we may slowly change the world. I'm so impressed at his wisdom in his youth.


  1. In Search of Deep Faith - InterVarsity Press;
  2. Peut-être un roman autobiographique (French Edition).
  3. Incline our Hearts (Lampitt Papers Book 1)?
  4. Queen of Estonia (Expats Book 3);

August This is a great easy read. It caused me to think about what I am as a person and ask if I am the best I can be.

Rediscover Catholicism

It encouraged me to look at who I want to be in the future and then take the steps to make it happen. It also details the "Jesus philosophy" is the key of true happiness. That contrary to what cult This is a great easy read. That contrary to what culture feed us as good, it is a philosophy of self donation, discipline and seeking God's plan for each and every individual. There is much much more Sep 09, Jill Tree rated it it was amazing. This book has inspired me to make our church a more spiritual place.

I hope every Christian person will read this to learn the Truth. Nov 22, Steven R. In the last three years I have read 17 books by Matthew Kelly. And I have found that all of them have helped me grow in my faith. From reading 'Why Am I Here?

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I say finally because this book along with The Four Signs of a Dynamic Catholic, were the first titles of Kelly's that I kept hearing about. But it would be a while before I got around to reading either. I think part of it was fear if disappointment. I had h In the last three years I have read 17 books by Matthew Kelly. I had heard so many great things about this book, it was going to be hard to live up to the hype. And I loved the other Rediscover … books by Kelly that I had read. But I should have known better. This book is an amazing read. And why this book has been so popular for the 16 years since it was first published.

But no matter what the subtitle of the book is it is an incredible read. For devote Catholics it will help deepen your faith, for those considering Catholicism or a return to Catholicism I would considerate almost essential reading. It will lay the ground work for a devoted, committed, and vibrant practice of faith. The sections n this book are: Prologue Imagine This Introduction Where to From Here?

What Sets Them Apart? And with how many of Kelly's book I have read and talks I have listened to, much of the book was familiar. Some of the stories he uses, and examples from his life or lives of others are uses elsewhere in his works. There was so much in this book that we need to learn and learn again.

Re-discovering Jesus – Part 13 – A Fruitless Tree – Hope

This book is an incredible read if all you walk away with is the 7 Pillars of Catholic Spirituality. But there is so much more than that in this volume. This is one of those spiritual books I will return to often. I believe in the years and generations to come that it will become a spiritual classic, along the lines of Practice of the Presence of God by Brother Lawrence. It is a book that has been impacting lives for 16 years and shows no inclination to slow it's impact and reach.

This is a book I would be comfortable giving to any Catholic, fallen away Catholic, or friend interested in knowing about Catholicism. It is hard not to read this book and feel your faith invigorated and inspired. This book is an easy read, in that it is accessible, and the material is presented in a clear and concise manner. But it is not an easy read in that you will likely be challenged, some of the stories may hit close to home. Once you have been awakened by this book you will have a choice, either to follow Jesus and the Catholic faith, or to try and go back to sleep.

But that second option will be harder than you think. Another incredible read by Matthew Kelly, and after reading this I really look forward to his forthcoming 'Rediscover the Saints'! I can give this book, all the Rediscover books, and likely anything by Kelly mu highest recommendation. Note: This book is part of a series of reviews: Catholic Reading Plan! Dec 25, Zach rated it it was amazing. Matt Kelly does a terrific narrative of why Catholicism is structured in a way that not only is a pathway towards God but is also a recipe to being the best person we can be.

My father-in-law originally recommended this book. The book appealed to my common sense and even more, to my sense of rationality in an increasingly irrational world. Just a couple of examples mi Matt Kelly does a terrific narrative of why Catholicism is structured in a way that not only is a pathway towards God but is also a recipe to being the best person we can be. Holiness as an attractive quality. But Kelly describes this in a different light, as the attractiveness of Jesus, something that has lasted more than 2, years and the simple fascination whenever someone goes out of his way to ease the burden of another.

There is something inherently interesting in these people who are kind in the face of what can be a mean and crazy world. The three prevailing philosophies of today. I can clearly see this, as I fall into myself: why is so-and-so having more fun than I am in life and working less? I must not be looking out for myself properly.

It almost seems natural to say these things and yet at their core, this rationale is not Christian. Complexity in our lives. The author believes our lives are suffering under an intolerable weight of ever-increasing complexities. There is a power in simplicity that we have lost and this is discussed in detail in the Spiritual Reading chapter. But thanks to this book, I think I can appreciate where at least a few steps towards Christ, towards bringing myself closer to the better person I can be and therefore a few steps toward a more authentic life is really what I desire in my core.

This book returned me to the confessional, has me tuning in to particular aspects of the Sunday readings and looking forward to the simple resonance of the rosary. I think the practical wisdom of this book will have me returning to it several times a year and really using it as a guideline throughout my life. So, here's the thing about this review. I'm not Catholic. I was for about five minutes when I was born and my grandfather freaked out that my nonreligious parents didn't have me baptized, putting my tiny immortal soul into terrible danger of burning for all eternity.

I am now decidedly Protestant, but a good portion of my family is Catholic and I study the medieval Catholic church So, here's the thing about this review. I am now decidedly Protestant, but a good portion of my family is Catholic and I study the medieval Catholic church for a living. So, although I personally have no real interest in "rediscovering Catholicism," knowledge is almost always useful. The thing about the book is that it's easy to pick on. For starters, whoever edited this needs to be taken out for a good beating--I'm not perfect by far in writing, but the comma splices and sentence fragments were actually distracting at times when I was reading.

And Kelly himself doesn't always make it easier; although he has a very accessible and flowing writing "voice," his battle cry is that "it seems the only accessible prejudice in this hyper-sensitive, politically correct, modern climate, is to be anti-Catholic" p. While I get what he's trying to say--and even agree, to a certain extent, that Catholicism has a lot of haters right now, most of whom don't understand the Church in the least and only know the scandals they've seen in the news--I think his self-imposed long-suffering-martyr status really gets in the way of his book's impact.

You won't win a whole lot of friends if you spend whole chunks of your writing space tearing apart Protestant beliefs and setting up the idea that Protestants are as misled as everyone else, that only Catholics have God truly figured out. First off, now you're just doing to us what you're complaining the rest of the world--somehow especially us, in your mind--does to you. Secondly, we play for the same team!

I don't know if anyone told you, but in a world where you feel you have no friends, it's best not to bash the people who think you're only mildly bonkers. One of the other things that drove me nuts about this was that it's less "Rediscovering Catholicism" and more "Rediscovering Why We Have Saints. They were great, but what about Anne? There are whole databases of these saints that you aren't talking about, Kelly. All of this being said, there are a lot of good one-liners in here, and the first chapter reads as a good rouser for Christianity as a whole.

Catholicism, at its core before people started trying to make it whatever else to "fit in" or to "stand out," is a beautiful expression of faith. I just wish that "Rediscovering Catholicism" didn't have to mean telling everyone else to bugger off. Apr 19, Kathleen Basi rated it liked it Shelves: religious.

For the first hundred pages I was skeptical; the prose wanders quite a bit, and reads like a motivational talk filled with generalities but little of substance. I kept waiting for him to dig in and tell us how to get from here to there. The overarching theme is that to revitalize our faith, the Church and the world, we must strive to become the "best versions of ourselves.

However, it is a worthwhile read for the chapters on the Pillars of Catholicism: confession, daily prayer, the Mass, the Bible, fasting, spiritual reading, and the rosary. Here, at last, he really delves into the rationale behind each of these practices. For instance, in the fasting chaper, he outlines the idea that true freedom can only be found when we are not slaves to the body. We would like to think our mind and soul is in charge, but the truth is that the body's desires are the driving force behind many of our actions.

Many of the most self-destructive behaviors in our society are possible because the body is behind the wheel instead of the mind and will. Fasting teaches you discipline and frees you from the slavery to the body's desires. Once I got there, I understood his reticence to hit specifics. Every person's calling is different, as unique as the individual, and his goal is to show us a path to finding out for ourselves what that is. A valid point, I think.

Overall: Well worth reading, but be aware that you'll have to wade through a lot of words to get to the point. I enjoyed connecting with the approach of this book. Better suited for someone who has a Christian background. We are called to move beyond the surface concerns of our lives, to explore and experience something deeper.

We are hungry for truth.

The theme of the book is to live an authentic life. The way we consume leads us to think less and less about more and more.


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  • Kelly describes three philosophies of today: 1. Fruits of individualism: greed, selfishness, exploitation- what is in it for me 2. Hedoni I enjoyed connecting with the approach of this book. Hedonism- feels good do it. But in end it produces not pleasure, but despair w addictions and enslavment 3. Minimalism -is the enemy of excellence and father of mediocrity. Maybe because I have spent years in learning to detach and take care of self, I am ready to thing happily about "what is the most I can do.

    To be a disciple- a trident- humble, docile, teachable listener. When are we most fully alive? When we embrace a life of discipline which doesn't enslave us but sets us free. Practice discipline in the spiritual, emotional, physical and mental. Freedom isn't the ability to do whatever you want, but strength of character n self possession to do what is good, true, noble and right.

    For me, it got me re-energized to focus and appreciate the gifts of my faith. Apr 01, Angela Joyce rated it liked it Shelves: catholicism. I've rarely, if ever, read such an enthusiastic book on Catholicism that wasn't written by a former, current, or future pope. I learned some new things, many of which I found enlightening and reassuring. However, the sweeping statement that "all non-Catholic Christians are Protestant" and then the generalization that these "Protestants" don't even know what they are protesting is highly offensive to me.

    The author himself takes offense at Catholics being labeled unChristian by other denomination I've rarely, if ever, read such an enthusiastic book on Catholicism that wasn't written by a former, current, or future pope. The author himself takes offense at Catholics being labeled unChristian by other denominations, so this just seemed like a nasty swipe. It nearly made me stop reading altogether, which would have been a pity, as the rest of the book is quite good. Additionally, I would have liked some discussion on the church's treatment of women. I don't think the shortage of priests is entirely due to the "Gospel not being preached.

    This is a huge stumbling block for me, and surely I'm not alone. Still, I respect what the author is aiming to achieve with this book: to clear up some misunderstandings and stereotypes about the church and bring people back to it with genuine openness rather than guilt or fear. Is it working? We'll see. I liked this book a lot better than Kelly's, "The Rhythm of Life. I kept wanting evangelization to happen in "Rhythm," and it never did. As a Christian, I don't think Kelly or any Christian for that matter can accurately speak about being the "best version of yourself" without speaking of Christ as "the way, the truth and the life.

    I felt this truth was missing in "The Rhythm of Life. Most of Kelly's apologetics are convincing. However, I do not feel Kelly effectively answers "why Catholicism" over other Christian faiths. Kelly also has a tendency to be a bit superfluous at times, but in all, the book is an easy, interesting, thought-provoking and FREE read. My mom gave me this book and I really enjoyed it. It's a great reminder of what it means to be Catholic in today's society. It's also got some fairly stern messages that we are drifting further and further away from our roots as a religion and getting back to a strong faith can only be accomplished through things like reconciliation and self-discipline.

    It made me take stock of some things I want to change in my life to become the best version of myself. I've already established two areas that I My mom gave me this book and I really enjoyed it. I've already established two areas that I need to pray about on a daily basis. I plan to re-read this book during my time each day in the "Classroom of Silence" - a great suggestion from the book for shutting out all of today's noise for a mere minutes each day. I believe you can order the book for free. Google Matthew Kelly to find his website and the link to Dynamic Catholic.

    I really loved this book. Quite hesitant at first, I plowed into it during Lent. No matter what your religion, this book will inspire you to be a better self. There is discussion on the many 'faults' of the current church, from pedophile priests to people just not interested in the Mass. Best of all are solutions that YOU can do, on your own, within the parameters of your life. I was ready for a jolt to smack me out of my complacence about many things.

    A Pilgrimage into the Beauty, Goodness and Heart of Christianity

    This read delivered it. I found so Oh my I found so much here, that I ordered books for each of my children. They vary in their spiritual practice and feelings for 'The Church', but I am certain that each will find a better way of living, just by looking at exerpts..