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  2. The Ghawa Syndrome in Kuwaiti-Arabic Verbs
  3. Aspects of Language Variation in Arabic Political Speech-Making : Nathalie Mazraani :
  4. Synonyms and antonyms of speech making in the English dictionary of synonyms

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Aspects of Language Variation in Arabic Political Speech-Making : Nathalie Mazraani :

Unavailable for purchase. Continue shopping Checkout Continue shopping. Public speaking. Synonyms and antonyms of speech making in the English dictionary of synonyms. Examples of use in the English literature, quotes and news about speech making. Nathalie Mazraani. Nathalie Mazraani, Whether writing a best man's speech or putting together a presentation at work, Speech-making and Presentation Made Easy is an invaluable guide to becoming a successful speaker, with easy-to-use, practical advice on how to: - Keep audiences Max Atkinson, This book shows in great detail how to prepare and deliver Masonic speeches for all occasions.

Over speeches and replies are given in full, covering almost every occasion that the Freemason will encounter. Hobbs, This book reviews our knowledge of the incoherent speech which can present as a symptom of schizophrenia. In order to convey his highest praise for the Lebanese people, the speaker here has created a format or a paradigm whereby the noun is preceded by a superlative.

However, when the speaker addresses Hizbollah followers, he uses an entirely different discourse register, which imposes a different use of lexis:. How can the human mind imagine that a few thousand of your Lebanese resistance sons, a few thousand of your Lebanese resistance sons The repetition here can also be interpreted as a response to those who have blamed Hizbollah for instigating the conflict. Muslims attributed this victory to divine intervention. The speaker uses this pronoun to convey the message that the resistance belongs to the whole Lebanese nation, thus extending the reach of the resistance and giving it a national legitimacy.

Switching from one genre of discourse to another is used by Nasrallah to persuade different sections of his audience. This is part of his unification strategy, which aims to bring all Lebanese factions and groups together. The speaker appears well aware of the impact of words in reinforcing his authority and status among the Arab and Muslim public. This is reflected in his repetition of the first-person plural pronoun, as demonstrated in the following example:. We are not a spontaneous resistance, we are not a sophistic resistance, we are not a resistance pulled to the ground that sees before it nothing but soil, we are not a resistance of chaos.

The pious, God-reliant, loving, and knowledgeable resistance is also the conscious, wise, trained, and equipped resistance that has plans. By repeating the first-person bound plural pronoun -na we , Nasrallah aims to persuade the Lebanese people that Hizbollah and his leadership are a strong and well-organised resistance. The message the speaker tries to convey here is that Hizbollah has a leadership that is strong and that has a vision for the future. It is apparent here that repetition is used to serve two main functions. The first is to persuade and the second is to warn.

The i mpetus behind repetition of this kind is to portray the speaker as a knowledgeable, powerful, strong and confident leader. The assonance in the second sentence is used to emphasize the strength of Hizbollah as a resistance movement. Whilst a positive register is adopted when referring to the Lebanese people and Hizbollah, a repetitive negative register is used in addressing those who opposed Hizbollah.

Dear brothers and sisters, dear beloved ones on the 18th day of the barbaric Zionist aggression on Lebanon, the barbaric American Zionist aggression on Lebanon ….. This paradigm has been used by different political leaders during times of conflict to rally their nations and supporters behind them van Dijk Nasrallah combines the strategies of hope and persuasion to maximise the impact of his discourse on his audience, as the following example of his 29 July speech demonstrates:.

Dear Lebanese people, if we persevere today we will be victorious. We will, God willing, be victorious. I would like to comment on what I read and what I hear in recent days on the question of victory, how to utilise victory and to whom that victory would be dedicated. Although Churchill and Nasrallah are completely different leaders with different beliefs and characters, both seem to use the strategy of hope.

Repetition and the strategy of naming and shaming.


  1. Repetition and Ideology in Nasrallah’s Political Speeches – Arab Media & Society.
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  3. Aspects of Language Variation in Arabic Political Speech-making - Nathalie Mazraani - Google книги;
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Whilst Nasrallah adopts a strategy of hope and praise when addressing the Lebanese people, he resorts to the strategy of naming and shaming when referring to his opponents. They stopped the war not for the sake of Lebanon, not for the sake of the children of Lebanon, not for the sake of the blood of women in Lebanon, and not for the sake of beautiful Lebanon.

They stopped the war only for the sake of Israel. What is striking here is the insertion of the negative particle la before the affirmative phrase min ajli to give the whole sentence a negative connotation. The speaker could have used the negative particle la to express his negative views, but this would not have achieved the same impact as la min ajli , which is used in different parallel structures.

The speaker could have used aw or instead of la , but this would not have achieved the same degree of negativity. You will not fight , not for the sake of Lebanon, nor for the sake of Gaza, nor for the sake of the West Bank, nor even for the sake of Jerusalem. The repetition here serves two main functions. First, it has a disparaging function in associating Arab governments with passivity and negligence in major Arab causes, such as the Palestinian cause.

He negates the verb tuqatilu you fight by the negation particle lan not , and then inserts another negation particle to the phrase min ajli. This is rare in Arabic sentence structure. Although the speaker has not broken Arabic grammatical rules here, the repetition of the negative particles does maximise the negative impact of the sentence. Whilst repetition of negation in the above extracts is designed to portray the opposition and the enemy in a bad light, repetition of negation is also used by Nasrallah to defend his allies and supporters, as is shown in the following extract:.

Today I will confine myself to saying that they, that is Iran and Syria, did not spark this war, they did not help to provide any cover for this war, and they never haggled at the expense of the resistance in Lebanon and Palestine, neither in the past, nor today, nor will they in the future. As extracts 8 and 9 show, repetition is used to serve two functions.

First, it is used to reinforce a negative image, and this occurs when the speaker refers to the opposition or enemy.

Synonyms and antonyms of speech making in the English dictionary of synonyms

Second, it is used to negate a negative attribution to defend allies and supporters. Repetition and the unification strategy. This strategy is seen in the extensive repetition of prepositions attached to cities and towns as seen in the example below.

Austria foreign minister delivers UN speech in Arabic language

Similarly, the use of prepositional phrases creates a poetic style that can be said to have an immediate emotional impact on the recipients, as the following examples show:. You are all welcome from the fighting and resisting south, to the steadfast Beqaa, to the loyal north, to the proud mountain, to the Beirut of Arabism, to the [southern] suburb of loftiness and dignity. You are all welcome — from the Palestinian refugee camps in Lebanon; you are all welcome — from Syria, Iran, Kuwait, Bahrain, and every country that came to us to celebrate and rejoice Speech: 22 September As demonstrated in the above examples, the repetition of prepositions has allowed the speaker to move from a very narrow discourse to a broader one.