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  1. ‎Neutral Milk Hotel's In the Aeroplane Over the Sea (33 1/3 Series) (Unabridged) on Apple Books
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  3. So easy. So fast. So Target.
  4. Neutral Milk Hotel's In the Aeroplane Over the Sea
  5. In the Aeroplane Over the Sea

It has also been written about, pored over, and analyzed more than most other albums put together. In this disarming book, Jim Fusilli focuses primarily on the emotional core of the album, on Brian Wilson's pitch-perfect cry of despair. In doing so, he brings to life the search for equilibrium and acceptance that still gives Pet Sounds its heart almost four decades after its release. Joy Division's career has often been shrouded by myths. But the truth is surprisingly simple: over a period of several months, Joy Division transformed themselves from run-of-the-mill punk wannabes into the creators of one of the most atmospheric, disturbing, and influential debut albums ever recorded.

Chris Ott carefully picks apart fact from fiction to show how Unknown Pleasures came into being, and how it still resonates so strongly today. Seemingly granted "classic album" status within days of its release in , OK Computer transformed Radiohead from a highly promising rock act into The Most Important Band in the World - a label the band has been burdened by and has fooled around with ever since.

Through close musical analysis of each song, Dai Griffiths explores the themes and ideas that have made this album resonate so deeply with its audience. Low is a kaleidoscope in which Bowie's obsessions and traits explode into fragments and reform in a new pattern. Thematically, it's the sound of a man struggling to get well.

Bowie has often talked about his fear of insanity. The Velvet Underground and Nico has influenced the sound of more bands than almost any other album. And remarkably, it still sounds as fresh and challenging today as it did upon its release in In this book, Joe Harvard covers everything from Lou Reed's lyrical genius to John Cale's groundbreaking instrumentation, and from the creative input of Andy Warhol to the fine details of the recording process.

Derided as one-hit wonders, estranged from their original producer and record label, and in self-imposed exile in Los Angeles, the Beastie Boys were written off by most observers before even beginning to record their second album — an embarrassing commercial flop that should have ruined the group's career. But not only did Paul's Boutique eventually transform the Beasties from a fratboy novelty to hip-hop giants, its sample-happy, retro aesthetic changed popular culture forever. The serene, delicate songs on Another Green World sound practically meditative, but the album itself was an experiment fueled by adrenaline, panic, and pure faith.

It was the first Brian Eno album to be composed almost completely in the confines of a recording studio, over a scant few months in the summer of The album was a proof of concept for Eno's budding ideas of "the studio as musical instrument", and a signpost for a bold new way of thinking about music. In this book, Geeta Dayal unravels Another Green World 's abundant mysteries, venturing into its dense thickets of sound.

Neil Young's Harvest is one of those strange albums that has achieved lasting success without ever winning the full approval of rock critics or hardcore fans. Even Young himself has been equivocal, describing it in one breath and his "finest" album, dismissing in the next as an NOR aberration. Here, Sam Inglis explores the circumstances of the album's creation and asks who got it right: The critics, or the millions who have bought Harvest in the 30 years since its release?

Instead of sticking to the "grunge pop" formula that made Nevermind so palatable to the mainstream, with In Utero Nirvana chose instead to challenge their audience, producing an album that truly matched Kurt Cobain's vision of what he had always wanted the band to sound like.

There's no sensationalism in this book - just the in-depth story of a great band, in the eye of a storm, striving to recapture their punk-rock ethic. Electric Ladyland is one of the greatest guitar albums ever made. During the recording process, Jimi Hendrix at last had the time and creative freedom to pursue the sounds he was looking for. In this remarkable and entertaining book, John Perry gets to the heart of Hendrix's unique talent - guiding the listener through each song on the album, writing vividly about Hendrix's live performances, and talking to several of Hendrix's peers and contemporaries.

What resonated about Endtroducing when it was released in , and what makes it still resonate today, is the way in which it loosens itself from the mooring of the known and sails off into an uncharted territory that seems to exist both in and out of time. Ignored by virtually everyone upon its release in November , The Kinks Are the Village Green Preservation Society is now seen as one of the best British albums ever recorded. Here, Andy Miller traces the perilous circumstances surrounding its creation, and celebrates the timeless, perfectly crafted songs pieced together by a band who were on the verge of disintegration and who refused to follow fashion.

In this wickedly entertaining and thoroughly informed homage to one of rock music's towering pinnacles, Erik Davis investigates the magic - black or otherwise - that surrounds this album. Carefully peeling the layers from each song, Davis reveals their dark and often mystical roots - and leaves the listener to decide whether this release is some form of occult induction or just an inspired, brilliantly played rock album. In contrast with many of their punk peers, Wire were enigmatic and cerebral, always keeping a distance from the crowd.

‎Neutral Milk Hotel's In the Aeroplane Over the Sea (33 1/3 Series) (Unabridged) on Apple Books

Although Pink Flag appeared before the end of , it was already a meta-commentary on the punk scene and was far more revolutionary musically than the rest of the competition. Few punk bands moved beyond pared-down rock 'n' roll and garage rock, football-terrace sing-alongs or shambolic pub rock and, if we're honest, only a handful of punk records hold up today as anything other than increasingly quaint period pieces. Few bands have inspired as much devotion as the Chicago rock band Wilco, and it's thanks, in large part, to the band's singer, songwriter, and guiding light: Jeff Tweedy.

But while his songs and music have been endlessly discussed and analyzed, Jeff has rarely talked so directly about himself, his life, and his artistic process. Through a series of interviews with a wide range of people connected to Pink Floyd in their earliest days including Nick Mason, Peter Jenner, Jenny Fabian, Storm Thorgerson, Duggie Fields and Peter Whitehead , John Cavanagh paints a vivid picture of how this remarkable debut album was created.

He brings to life the stories behind each track, as well as Pink Floyd's groundbreaking live performances of the time. In the spring of , the inauspicious release of Captain Beefheart and the Magic Band's Trout Mask Replica, a double-album featuring 28 stream-of-consciousness songs filled with abstract rhythms and guttural bellows, dramatically altered the pop landscape. Through some word associations around the words burning building, falling from the sky and 14 the second half of this song has it's own personal meanings to me. It's of course unobjective and wrong to put these sorts of interpretations on to things.

In my head I dedicate this song to the person whose name I'll never know who I watched fall and die in front of me that morning. If I had a time machine I'd want to go back and save both of us, it wouldn't be possible, but since it's all a fantasy I'd also save all of the other people who died while I looked on from a safer distance between 13th and 14th streets. And when we break we'll wait for our miracle. God is a place you will wait for the rest of your life. Incest, and God and circus freaks, they all make return appearances here.

For awhile this was my favorite song on the album, well for awhile about half the album was my favorite song at one point or another. But this was my penultimate favorite song. The song is a borderline rambling mess leading up to the God part that even though I don't believe in God still feels so important, like something very true is being imparted, and right out of comments about God the song abruptly reprises "Two-Headed Boy Pt.

It's kind of sort of a perfect ending to the album. I don't remember how long ago I started this review. It's been months. It's not at all how I pictured it would end up. It's not the review of the album I imagined it would be. My favorite tracks on the album are barely commented on, I just have no vocabulary for getting the reasons why I love a song into words. I thought I'd be able to. Sorry if this was rambling and once again self-indulgent. Thanks for reading. View all 18 comments. Apr 21, Paul Austin rated it really liked it.

I hear N. The list is much longer. I was hesitant to even crack this book.

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The album it covers has a mysterious, timeless feel; would too much information dull that, or rather, bring the album too much into focus? Bandleader and songwriter Jeff Mangum pulled the plug on the band after this record, even as his audience was growing steadily. It was pre-ProTools in every bedroom studio, and pre-internet culture although not pre-internet itself. Aeroplane seems to be of an earlier time, when bands in smaller cities incubated in a less media-saturated climate.

There was less temptation to please by aping whatever Pitchfork was fawning over that week. Without immediate access to that info, the reflexive desire to copy something successful was kept at bay. And it only gets more rewarding. I imagine there is a sort of shadow figure created in the center of the book; all these people talking about one person who only appears in the memories of others.

There are certainly plenty of places where someone can find a record of Jeff speaking, but in this book, where I was doing all the interviews myself and not using existing ones, Jeff simply chose not to be one of the voices. If that adds to his mystique, so be it. Before beginning work on the book, I spoke with Jeff and let him know who I was and what my intentions were when writing about his life and his friends. Had he been vehemently against my doing the book as an oral history and as an intimate study of the creation of Aeroplane, I would probably have changed my focus and written a different book about the album.

But happily, he seemed cool with it. Or am I nitpicking by even trying to separate the two? Absolutely it is. View 1 comment. Sep 04, Alex rated it liked it. A good read, but I was disappointed with several things. Halfway through, the author is like "So the editors asked me if I was going to do a line-by-line analysis and I definitely didn't want to tear apart the album by doing that! You wrote a book solely about one album! Analyze it A good read, but I was disappointed with several things. Analyze it! She eventually does go ahead and do these cursory analyses of each song, but they feel perfunctory, with a lot of 12th-grade English bullshit tenuous connections "This song may be inspired by the French surrealist Berzumeau's work 'La Vie Poopoo' And she never discussed the major themes of the album--you could write fifty pages just on the somatic imagery alone most of the songs have very descriptive, physical references to the body and body parts.

To be fair, the book wasn't what I expected it to be. And where do I get off expecting a book to be anything? I wanted a detailed analysis of the album itself, the songs, even a breakdown of what instruments were played where, etc. This book does not provide that. There was only one brief chapter on lyrics. Overall though, it's very well written, and there's plenty of discussion of the band's sound as a whole, and a very interesting bit on how the record was produced with fuzz!

Yes, this is one of my favorite albums of all time and I understand and have experienced the life-changing and affirming power of music heck, I've written a short story and a novel inspired by NMH , but damn, Magnum isn't Jesus Christ. Is he? You'd think he is by the reverence with which he's treated including one vomit inducing line comparing his public disappearance to the horrible death of Anne Frank.

So easy. So fast. So Target.

Um, break, please give it to me. Aug 07, Wade rated it really liked it Shelves: music. Murmur and Pet Sounds were both albums that I loved before reading the books about them; they were albums that I had already memorized backwards and forwards and I already loved every single note on those albums, and reading a book about each one of them only made me love those albums even more. This was an album that I had never gotten into.

I guess the timing was wrong, but it just never hit me in such a way that I really cared about it. What is it about this album that does that? I really enjoyed the way Kim Cooper wrote… she took you back into the season that Jeff and the band were making this album and made you feel like you were living with them and riding around in the van with them and just getting to know them. I have a very odd experience with the lyrics to songs. World War II! This book was really well written and helped me to peel back even more layers of enjoyment on an album that I continue to enjoy more and more.

Jan 02, Matthew Fitzgerald rated it liked it. It's hard to write a review for this book without having it clouded by what I was expecting from it. I became a fan of NMH a few years ago and have orbited this album for years, returning to it at odd times and delving deeper and deeper into its lyrics and lore each time. So when I learned that this book existed, I was really excited to read a dissection of the music, a literary analysis of the work as a whole.

What I got instead was a placement of this album: historically in the Elephant 6 "mov It's hard to write a review for this book without having it clouded by what I was expecting from it. What I got instead was a placement of this album: historically in the Elephant 6 "movement," geographically in the places and people that came together to rehearse and record it, and chronologically in the lives of the people and the years it was released into the world.

While I got some of what I expected from it, I can't fault the author for not writing the book that I wanted to read. In the end, it was more of a biography of the band and the album than a plumbing of the work's artistic depths, I can only say that this book helped be understand how the music was made, and not why I find it so beautiful. Dec 08, Amy rated it really liked it Shelves: Interesting take by someone who obviously adores the band and the album but who avoids the usual mania of the hardcore NMH cult member and the pretension of the indie rock critic although the author does go off the rails a couple of times -- for example, Jeff Mangum's self-imposed exile is not at all like Anne Frank's actual death.

Not even a little bit. I liked this book very much and feel like I got a sense of what it was like to be at the creation of this music and the scene that grew aroun Interesting take by someone who obviously adores the band and the album but who avoids the usual mania of the hardcore NMH cult member and the pretension of the indie rock critic although the author does go off the rails a couple of times -- for example, Jeff Mangum's self-imposed exile is not at all like Anne Frank's actual death. I liked this book very much and feel like I got a sense of what it was like to be at the creation of this music and the scene that grew around the band in Athens.

Apr 30, Sam rated it really liked it Recommends it for: musical collectives. Shelves: musiccriticism. It's not a fanboy book! I swear! It's only kind of a fanboy book! It's only kind of for cult members and sunshine children and those who like to scream religious rants into microphones in the early morning as deaf grandmothers knit in the other room of a small white house in Queens!

Jul 09, Paul Siegell rated it it was amazing. Feb 14, Jon Hewelt rated it it was amazing. I love this series, and this book is a wonderful, wonderful addition to it. That exploration may take the shape of an oral history, an analysis of the music, an interpretation of themes, or a personal anecdote of how the album shaped the author's life.

As to be expected, this freedom results in certain expectations not being met by certain readers, for certain titles. I mention this because, curiou I love this series, and this book is a wonderful, wonderful addition to it. I mention this because, curious, I scoped out some of the other GoodReads reviews as I was reading, and many expressed disappointment that Kim Cooper didn't offer much analysis of In the Aeroplane Over the Sea, in and of itself.

At the time, I, too, felt slightly disappointed that we didn't get more information on the album's contents.

Neutral Milk Hotel's In the Aeroplane Over the Sea

A few years ago I fell-hard--for In the Aeroplane Over the Sea, and wanted to know so much more about it. There was something about it that hit deep inside my soul. Something almost religious, though I gave up concrete religious ideals years ago. I was in love, and I felt a special, different kind of love with those who'd also listened, and who also loved it. By the book's end, I'd received that deeper understanding, but not in the way I expected, and yet so much more satisfying than what I'd hoped.

Kim Cooper's In the Aeroplane Over the Sea is an oral history of Neutral Milk Hotel and the Elephant 6 collective: how they met each other, when they started playing music together, where they traveled and how they lived. Everything that led up to the recording of In the Aeroplane Over the Sea, and a little bit after. Testimony identifies Elephant 6 as a collective of people first, musicians second.

Albums were recorded, concerts were played, but above all hung this idea of forming a loving and nurturing and supportive community. A community of understanding each others quirks Jeff Mangum's sleepwalking, for example , and embracing each other fully. There is a little bit, near the end, about the actual album: little pieces of trivia that color individual tracks in certain ways. But to paraphrase, Cooper, the primary text is the album, and the secondary text is one's interpretation of it.

She did not want to add her own conjecture, at the risk of dismantling the wonder and mystery of such a unique work of art. And after all, what does that conjecture matter? Is there a definitive answer to the interpretation of lyrics? For some albums, perhaps. What happens to you, when you listen?

Cooper's oral history offers a perspective on creativity removed from the corporate system. A perspective focused on love, and creation for the sake of creation: ideas I myself want to fully embrace. And if nothing else, pick up a copy of this book, turn to the last page, and read it. Blew me away. Sep 26, Malcolm Almuntazar-Harris rated it it was amazing. Absolutely recommend to any music enthusiasts out there who want to learn a little bit of history behind one of the most in famous and iconic albums in indie music.

Cooper gives a great run-down of the Athens DIY music scene that ultimately led to the conditions which produced Neutral Milk Hotel and then their two albums. Accompanied with many interesting tidbits about the lives and personalities of the members. Also Cooper provided really interesting context to each song in the album along wit Absolutely recommend to any music enthusiasts out there who want to learn a little bit of history behind one of the most in famous and iconic albums in indie music.

Also Cooper provided really interesting context to each song in the album along with how the iconic In the Aeroplane Over the Sea album cover was made. Thoroughly enjoyed this quick read. Jul 17, daniel rated it liked it. Jan 18, J. Wilson rated it it was amazing. It was love at first sight for me and 'In the Aeroplane Over the Sea': three-quarters of the way through my first listen to it, I was ordering it on Amazon.

It somehow manages to be everything at once: it's simultaneously extremely direct and completely opaque; robustly conceptual recurring characters including a two-headed boy, a Siamese twin called Goldaline, Anne Frank and glued together from abstractions; ramshackle and chaotic yet meticulous; recorded on acoustic instruments yet full of f It was love at first sight for me and 'In the Aeroplane Over the Sea': three-quarters of the way through my first listen to it, I was ordering it on Amazon.

It somehow manages to be everything at once: it's simultaneously extremely direct and completely opaque; robustly conceptual recurring characters including a two-headed boy, a Siamese twin called Goldaline, Anne Frank and glued together from abstractions; ramshackle and chaotic yet meticulous; recorded on acoustic instruments yet full of fuzz and experimental noise. It was Neutral Milk Hotel's second album, but there have never been any others.

Miraculously, Cooper manages to distill the essence of the album without unlocking any of its mysteries, helped by the availability of the performers: most of the band and their collaborators give interviews, but enigmatic frontman Jeff Mangum does not. It helps that the album's sound and story are so closely linked: musicians working unsatisfying jobs are lured to the big city to master unfamiliar instruments, where they share communal houses and scary sleepwalking experiences and record chaotic songs in unsuitable rooms.

They then go on tour and play the songs, where they throw each other into drumkits, play disintegrating instruments, leave thousands of pounds in Pizza Hut accidentally, but are united by their love for each other and the astonishing songs that they play. All of the band speak reverentially about the songs and about Mangum himself.

Everyone thinks this record is something special. Cooper's book is full of energy, leaves nothing uncovered, tells the story of both the album and of NMH's career in total, provides some - but not too much - technical production-geek detail and some broad lyrical outlines, and feels like a book written with a deep love for the album.

All of them should be like this.


  1. Neutral Milk Hotel's In the Aeroplane Over the Sea (33 1/3) Kim Cooper: Continuum.
  2. Mon tout premier Évangile (La foi des petits) (French Edition);
  3. Green - Includes Alternate Ending (The Circle Series).
  4. in the aeroplane over the sea 33 1/3 book by kim cooper?
  5. Kim Cooper - 33 1/3: Neutral Milk Hotel - In The Aeroplane Over The Sea – Rough Trade?
  6. 33 1/3: Neutral Milk Hotel - In The Aeroplane Over The Sea.

Apr 01, Allison rated it liked it Recommends it for: hardcore music lovers, indie rock nerds. I first heard about this series when a friend of mine sent information about the publisher seeking pitches for the next one. I was intrigued. And surprised, because my library has a bunch of them. The book was clearly written with love and the research and interviews of people involved excepting, it seems, Jeff Mangum are all interesting and provided insight into the history and making of one of my favorite albums.

However, as with most books about music, I found myself wanting to shut the book and just put the album on. Writing and reading about music is so peculiar, at once intriguing and almost wholly unnecessary: just listen. I am not a musician and I think maybe some of the more technical parts of this book went a bit over my head. I did enjoy the descriptions of the Athens music scene and I enjoyed thinking about the band thinking about this album in their shared houses and testing out all the songs that have become so important to me at small shows filled with friendly faces.

I like visualizing the story of the album. And that's why I'll probably read other titles in this series. View 2 comments. Jul 20, Mike rated it it was amazing Shelves: non-fiction. That's what you've got to share, and that's as real and important as the fact that you're alive. We were able, at a really young age, to somehow protect each other so we could feel that. The world at large, careerism, money, magazines, your parents, the people at the rock club in your town, other kids, nothing is going to give you that message, necessarily. In fact, m " In fact, most things are going to load you away from it, sadly, because humanity is really confused at the moment.

But you wouldn't exist if the universe didn't need you. And any time I encounter something beautiful that came out of a human somewhere, that's them, that's their own soul. That's just pure, whatever its physicality is, if the person can play piano, if they can't play piano, if they're tone deaf, whatever it is, if it's pure, it hits you like a sledgehammer. It fills up your own soul, it makes you want to cry, it makes you glad you're alive, it lets you come out of you. And that's what we need: we desperately need you.

Feb 08, Max Maxwell rated it it was amazing Shelves: read-it-in , music. I don't want to go on about this book more than I have on every music forum on the Internet, suffice to say that it is excellent, and certainly the best book in the 33 series. Cooper is crisp both in tone and approach to subject matter, and leaves no question unanswered. It dissects his lyrics and his Anne Frank obsession and involves interviews with all band members. If you are a fan of the band, this book is essential.

Otherwise, it's still highly recommended; buy the book and a copy of the record, and listen and learn simultaneously. May 21, Chris - Quarter Press Editor rated it it was amazing.

In the Aeroplane Over the Sea

For me, this made a perfect entry. It's an album I love and one that carries its own mythos. Even more, I was able to see Neutral Milk Hotel last year during their farewell tour. To gain some insight into the history of the band and their process was wonderful for me. I loved the "behind the music" feel, and ate this book up in a single sitting.

If you're looking for an analysis of the album or even an interpretation of it or an explanation for Mangum's mystery, this isn't the place. But if you want to hear about how a group of musicians came together to write and record one of the best albums of the '90s, then this is a wonderful book and companion. Jul 23, Jeffreykloss rated it it was ok. So interesting to read, it even cast light onto the last 2 seconds of a song i'd listened to many many times. Oct 07, lucy black rated it really liked it Shelves: non-fic.

Things I didn't like about it were: the writing style, the fact after fact after fact stuff and the way the author only scratches the surface of the band's personalities and the things they were into.