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  1. Invisible | Paul Auster | Macmillan
  2. 'Invisible: A Novel' by Paul Auster
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Emma Dockery , Harrison 'Books' Bookman. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Invisible , please sign up. This question contains spoilers… view spoiler [can anybody tell me who they think they guy from the football game is, who detonated the fireworks bombs? Tristin This answer contains spoilers… view spoiler [ I was wondering that myself, i had a few questions that weren't answered by the books end. However I'd like to imagine it was Mary in a well …more I was wondering that myself, i had a few questions that weren't answered by the books end.

However I'd like to imagine it was Mary in a well disguise.. Since she had plenty of practice in her lifetime of disguising her true gender, i figured that's plausible. I'm really enjoying this book so far and can't wait to read more of Patterson's works. I'm not sure of the best place to ask a question about all of this books. James has quite a few books and I'm trying to determine which one to read next. I'm not sure I want to get into books in a series yet, but can anyone recommend his top 5 best books?

I want to read those next and then I'll move toward the books in the series. Candace I love the Woman's Murder Club series. Can't wait for the next book to come out! Suzanne's Diary for Nicholas is the only non mystery book of his that I have read. It is also worth the read. See all 14 questions about Invisible…. Lists with This Book.

Invisible | Paul Auster | Macmillan

Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. This was a great read, one of those books it is impossible to put down until the very last, totally satisfying, page. Admittedly the main character was a total idiot and I honestly could not understand what Bookman saw in her, but it all made for a really good story with a very dramatic finale. I can always rely on Patterson for a good, escapist mystery. This one was co written with David Ellis and it was very well done. Recommended if you enjoy lots of action, many dead bodies and edge of your This was a great read, one of those books it is impossible to put down until the very last, totally satisfying, page.

Recommended if you enjoy lots of action, many dead bodies and edge of your seat thrills! View all 10 comments. In another stellar Patterson novel more on his secret ingredient below , readers are treated to some wonderful narrative and a powerful plot to keep the story fast-paced and thrilling to the end. Emmy Dockery is an FBI analyst with a past; one that has her on suspension as she deals with the death of her twin sister in a house fire. She as been anything but idle during that time, concocting a theory that a number of house fires across the US, deemed accidental, are actually elaborate murder sce In another stellar Patterson novel more on his secret ingredient below , readers are treated to some wonderful narrative and a powerful plot to keep the story fast-paced and thrilling to the end.

She as been anything but idle during that time, concocting a theory that a number of house fires across the US, deemed accidental, are actually elaborate murder scenes, whose victims are slain in such a way that it appears the killer must be 'invisible'. While she tries to convince Harrison "Books" Bookman of the theory, her past beau, he helps her pitch the idea to the Assistant Director. When it falls flat, Emmy must come to terms that this murderer, as sly as he is cunning, may get away with over fifty murders while the authorities are none the wiser. After Emmy secures one strong clue, the case falls into place and the FBI is finally interested; rushing to keep the body count from getting any higher.

Emmy and Books rush across the country to stop the spree, while the murderer remains one step ahead, with an audio diary of his own, hinting at his motive and rationale behind the killings. Patterson's excellent piece of thriller fiction is not to be missed, as it rises above much of the literary attempts labelled with the author's moniker. Patterson has found the secret ingredient to boost his dwindling success at producing worthwhile novels; David Ellis.

In both recent novels bearing his name as co-author, the contribution Ellis makes to the stories infuse much into Patterson's work, helping it surpass even the popular Patterson series. The ideas are fresh and the characters have depth, leaving the reader to yearn for more as each short chapter comes to a close.

As a team, Patterson and Ellis create an eerie sense of doom and action that cannot be replicated in a simple Alex Cross or Lindsay Boxer novel. If only Patterson would step away from his need to bask in subpar literary glory and focus on collaborating with some superior authors like Ellis, fans and new readers alike would find pleasure rather than a continued sense of despair when opening a Patterson novel.

Kudos, Messrs. Patterson and Ellis for this wonderful tale. I was, truly, captivated from the beginning all the way through to the final pages.

'Invisible: A Novel' by Paul Auster

You and your production editor may think that this adds 'mystique' or 'character' or a 'third voice' to the production. Here's the scoop -- in case none of you have ever listened to an audiobook -- the reader is creating their own scenes, character portraits and drama as they listen to the book.

They do not need the remedial aid of music. If we wanted to hear music, we'd go to our music list and play that. The music is distracting and unfortunately quite loud so that it opacifies the voice of the narrator. Do you want the words to your story told, or do you want to do a theatrical production?

You choose. Then we'll choose whether we ever want to read another one of your books. Until then, you'll get poor ratings from this reader and others. Thanks for your consideration. By the way, this was one of the better Patterson co-written books I've read in a while. It was worthy of at least a 4 Star rating, but any book that induces a migraine from the sound gets dinged. View all 27 comments. Emmy Dockery had lost her sister Marta to a house fire eight months previously, a fire the authorities had called accidental. Emmy in the meantime had been researching house fires right across the US, doing the leg work on her own as no-one within the FBI would believe her claims.

As more and more deaths continued to occur, always a house fire, a Emmy Dockery had lost her sister Marta to a house fire eight months previously, a fire the authorities had called accidental. As more and more deaths continued to occur, always a house fire, always declared accidental, Emmy became desperate — she was convinced there was an ingenious and deadly serial killer at work. Frustrated and angry she wondered why no-one would take notice of her. But they were frustrated at every turn. Emmy knew she was right — but how to find that small shred of evidence she needed to convince her bosses….

It seemed that Emmy was the only one who was convinced there was a sadistic madman out there — the dangers were multiplying, the clock was ticking… This thriller was absolutely brilliant! I felt like I was holding my breath for the last pages! Totally gripping, the pace was fast, the plot intense. I have no hesitation in recommending this latest stand-alone thriller by Patterson and Ellis highly. View all 4 comments. It's hard to love a book when you hate the protagonist.

View 1 comment. I loved this book. It kept me guessing the whole time. As I said once before though about James Patterson's co-authored books I definitely give all the credit to David Ellis. I'm getting ready to buy Mr. Ellis's first book he published on his own. View all 8 comments. Review can be read at It's About The Book I am going to just jump right in and say that this book scared the hell out of me!

Patterson and Ellis have written the most terrifying villain since Hannibal Lector first gave me nightmares years ago. It was chilling!

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This book made me remember late nights with the covers pulled up to my chin, knowing the next scene on the screen was going to make me scream! Lovely, scary story. Emmy is going right to the top of my favorite heroines Review can be read at It's About The Book I am going to just jump right in and say that this book scared the hell out of me!

Emmy is going right to the top of my favorite heroines list. She is strong, she is determined and she is grieving. One of those deaths she is investigating is the death of her sister, her twin sister, Marta, a death that has been labeled an accident by the local authorities. Death by fire. But no one believes her, and her credibility with her FBI supervisor is already in jeopardy over an unrelated issue. This book is not a romance, but there is a love interest. With his help they begin to make a case that the FBI can no longer ignore. In the meantime, throughout the story, the villain taunts us with his manifesto.

Taunt after taunt. I wanted to help hunt him down. Pure evil. The ending of this story, this hunt for a demented killer, will make me lose sleep. Just when I was convinced that I had it all figured out, I was wrong. The ending is stunning. I know that this book is labeled as a stand alone, but I would love to see more of Emmy and Books. What a team. What a story. What a rush! View 2 comments. I remember reading Patterson in the early days of Alex Cross novels.

I loved the pacing and twists and turns the stories would take. Though maybe not literary masterpieces they were the kind of books I had a hard time putting down. In any case I knew exactly what I was getting myself into. I needed something fairly I remember reading Patterson in the early days of Alex Cross novels. I needed something fairly "mindless" to fill the reading gap between the "heavier" books I've been picking up lately. Invisible is a stand alone novel and that was a part of its appeal.

Emmy Dockery is an FBI research analyst obsessed with a series of fires that have been declared accidental. Emmy is convinced that they are a work of an extremely meticulous arsonist who is so good that he managed to make himself invisible to the police. She is also emotionally damaged in more ways than one and not the easiest person to like.

In her quest to convince her agency that she is not delusional and that these murders are actually happening she enlists the help of her ex-boyfriend and a former FBI agent, Harrison Bookman. View all 6 comments. Feb 28, Allie Riley rated it it was amazing.

Following the party he is witness to a murder and the consequences of that ripple throughout the novel. Combined with incest and intrigue these events keep you gripped to the very end. Nothing is quite as it seems and, even now, I am not entirely sure of the exact truth. With regard to style, there are, effecti was a pivotal year for Adam Walker, for it was then, when he was a twenty-year-old student in New York, that he met the enigmatic Rudolph Bern and his then partner Margot at a party.

With regard to style, there are, effectively, three narrators, part II is in the second person and inverted commas are not used something which usually annoys me. The characters felt extremely life-like and were well drawn. Although I have not met anyone like these people and, frankly in some cases, I sincerely hope I never do they were eminently believable.

His writing is superb - just enough description to imagine yourself there - and the book is very tightly plotted indeed. This was my first foray into Auster's work. It will by no means be my last. May 19, Brian rated it it was amazing. This book caught my interest from page 1. It tells the tale of Adam, who stumbles into a friendship with some very odd people, Margot, and her lover, Born.

The tale told is one that is captivating and intriguing. There is some definite ambiguity, and the reader is left wondering how much of Adam's tale is fiction or reality. I would highly recommend this book. The only problem that could annoy a reader is the change from first to second to third person narrative, but I quickly adapted to this.

Oct 01, Miquel Reina rated it really liked it Shelves: pearl , top-books. Invisible was the first book I read from Paul Auster and since then I think that the famous American author is one of the best writers of our time. Invisible is an intelligent and extremely well-written novel, Auster is a magician of words and twists.

However, I have to say that although I liked the novel, I thought that the ending would be much more powerful. Invisible es una novela inteligente y Auster un mago de las palabras y de los giros inesperados. View 1 comment. Aug 06, Sam Quixote rated it liked it. My feelings are conflicted with this book. I didn't hate it. I got through the book in 4 days, not rushing, and found Auster's style of writing still as compelling and easy to read as ever.

On the other hand the story, while readable and familiar, just wasn't as compelling as I think Auster must have thought it was and neither was the bad guy nearly as menacing or complex. Paul Auster is a literary writer and is a highly respected, bestselling writer of post modern stories. Yet despite this he c My feelings are conflicted with this book. Yet despite this he can write a book that reads as fluidly as a thriller mostly because he is a master of pacing and knows precisely how to draw the reader in and when to step up the action. He showcases various styles in the four parts the book is divided in - the first person, the second person, the third person narrative styles are all used and served to highlight how talented the man is as well as to keep the story fresh for the reader events are rehashed throughout.

Yet the central point of the story - I won't give it away but it comes at the end of Part 1 - just seemed contrived. And if you think about the circumstances, it wasn't that shocking. It serves to show a different side to the bad guy who until then seemed to be a foppish poseur. Familiar ground then, and yet despite Auster having written similar stories in this fashion many times before I was still compelled to read on. The story never really goes anywhere though.

The bookish hero is haunted by the events at the end of Part 1, Part 2 reveals a sordid past to the hero, Part 3 continues the haunted hero's recounting of the events at the end of Part 1 and a showdown with the bad guy, Part 4 throws a few twists in and ends on a mysterious metaphor. It's frustrating because I can't go into much detail without ruining the story but the story never really feels as dramatic as it thinks it is, nor as powerful in it's examination of some of the complex relationships in the book.

By the end I didn't care and the last 30 pages dragged a bit. The final twist merited a simple shrug from me as I wasn't concerned with any of the characters at that point.

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As for the title "Invisible", well, book groups can talk about what it means, I'll hazard a guess and say it might describe the real lives we lead and the lives we wished we'd led - the real life and the invisible life. But again, I didn't think about it too much, this isn't that sort of book. It's not Auster's best but if you're a big fan of his like me you'll read it and find things to like about it.

Overall though it's quite underwhelming and strangely forgettable. Still, it's not his worst and is an entertaining enough read. Glad he left himself out of this one though. Or did he Jan 12, Gladia rated it it was ok. Spring: New York: Walker meets Born at a party and the professor, just a few days later and for no good reason, offers to give money to the young student to make a literary magazine. Their professional partnership soon dies when Born stabs to death a boy who's trying to rob him and Walker.

The story is weak since the very beginning and lacks of imagination to explain most of the events. Walker is depicted as a reasonable character but Born, an opinionated on everything French professor who seems t Spring: New York: Walker meets Born at a party and the professor, just a few days later and for no good reason, offers to give money to the young student to make a literary magazine. Walker is depicted as a reasonable character but Born, an opinionated on everything French professor who seems to have connections with some secret governmental agency, is remarkably annoying.

Summer: Still New York: the incestuous relationship between Walker and his sister. For sure that's the best part of the novel. Emotional, touching, full of pathos, truthful and free of prejudices of any kind. I was almost disappointed by the fact that, later in the novel, Gwyn, Walker's sister denies the truth of the affair, but that doesn't change the fact that 'summer' is the what gives power to the whole book and it's a shame it's so short. To be noticed: no Born appearances in summer Fall: Paris: Walker enrolls in the student abroad program and moves to the French capital, shortly meets Born and their conflict, ceased for that summer, starts again, together with the fall down of the quality of the story.

Walker tries to ruin Born's soon to happen marriage but gets kicked out of the country with a month mysterious powerful forces connected to Born. Ending: 'Fall' wasn't good but the end is very bad. We read parts of the diary of the daughter of Born's supposedly future wife. That's the worst part of the novel and Born comes back to dominate the story. Overall this was a weak novel. Auster is a story teller and 'Invisible' is marked all over with his typical style but the end result failed my expectations. Jul 25, Larry H added it. Although I try to read a lot of different books by different authors, I certainly have a group of favorites.

If I see a new book by one of these writers if I haven't been tracking them on Amazon , I will immediately by it when I see it. Paul Auster is one of those. The minute I saw his new book, Invisible, I nearly leapt on it I'm crazy like that and, of course, bought it. Invisible is a well-written, intriguing and odd book. It starts in at Columbia University. Adam Walker is a college Although I try to read a lot of different books by different authors, I certainly have a group of favorites.

Adam Walker is a college student dreaming of life as a poet when he encounters Rudolf Born and his girlfriend, Margot, at a party. Rudolf and Margot immediately intrigue young Adam with their worldliness, and the couple becomes somewhat intrigued by him as well. What happens shortly thereafter is a shocking act of violence that has ramifications for the rest of the book. And that's where everything gets a little bit hinky. The book is divided into four sections. The first is narrated by Adam himself, the second and third sections are narrated by a college friend of Adam's through Adam's words and the fourth is narrated by another character and almost feels tacked on.

There are a lot of big issues in this book--murder, incest, voyeurism, emotional anguish--yet not a lot of it resonates. I loved the story Auster was telling even as I felt uncomfortable reading pieces of it, but ultimately I was left somewhat unfulfilled. I guess I'll hope his next one has a bit more for me. Oct 30, Janet Tomasson rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites.

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This is the first time I've read Paul Auster's book. I had just finished it, and the urge to read the rest of his books was burning in me now. Fascinating, sweeping, smart, setting a high bar that will include great literary conventions that give almost historic value to the level of writing that the word 'impressive' may insult.

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Auster merges some characters and sets up a thought-provoking discussion of their moral twists and turns. The book intersperses a human mosaic. Exciting and painful, This is the first time I've read Paul Auster's book. Exciting and painful, sensational and blunt, vulgar and breathtaking. The ending may be too random and detached, but the reader opens a warm and pleasant place to thoughts that slowly sewn up as soon as the book closes and goes to spend on the shelf with his colleagues. Great book!!! Oct 23, Chris Dietzel rated it really liked it. The first part of this book seemed uninspired, and I got the impression that this might be the first of Auster's books I didn't enjoy.

But by Part 2 it had my attention and parts 3 and 4 were as good as the author's other books. An odd aside: Auster's titles are usually very obvious in their meaning to the story. However, I still don't know why this one was titled "Invisible. View all 3 comments. Nov 29, Jim Coughenour rated it liked it.

The books had a cool stylish look including the author photo ; the pr One rainy spring night back in , I wandered into Guild Bookstore Lincoln Avenue, Chicago, extinct and was beguiled by a sexy set of hardbacks — The New York Trilogy by Paul Auster — an author I'd never heard of. The books had a cool stylish look including the author photo ; the prose was set in a smart Bodini.

So I was delighted when I discovered the stories were as aesthetically satisfying as desaturated cityscapes on their covers. Regrettably, the experience wasn't easy to duplicate. Over the years I'd pick up each Auster book as it appeared; few provided the same thrill. From the distance of odd years I observe that I've found more pleasure in his autobiographical essays and the peculiar mini-classic The Red Notebook than in his novels. The objective correlative for that last one is the smell of old man's urine.

A couple weeks ago I read Auster's newest — Invisible — and fortunately had finished it before I read the evisceration by James Woods in this week's New Yorker. It may even be fair. But I doubt it will affect my proclivity for Auster, however abused it's become. As I read Invisible, I felt as if I was watching an old friend perform his usual set of magic tricks. The plot unfolds in a set of familiar games, elliptical exercises on first-, second- and third-person narration, found manuscripts and unnerving coincidences, served up with usual tenor of agonized introspection.

The plot, such as it is, completely collapses by the end. But no matter. Auster may not be the transgressive modernist he affects to be if indeed he does but I still relish the ominous play of character and coincidence, as predictable as a ghost story, best read before bed with a dram of single malt. Dec 02, Bookmarks Magazine rated it really liked it Shelves: jan-feb Invisible contains many of the hallmarks of Auster's trade: formal literary devices and stylistic high jinks, psychological depth, elegant prose, and the manipulation of information, voices, and stories. Told against the background of 40 years of history, with shame and colonial guilt ever present, Invisible feels "warmer and more human than the stuff he's famous for" San Francisco Chronicle as well as less contrived and more hopeful.

Indeed, notes the New York Times Book Review , it's "a love Invisible contains many of the hallmarks of Auster's trade: formal literary devices and stylistic high jinks, psychological depth, elegant prose, and the manipulation of information, voices, and stories. Indeed, notes the New York Times Book Review , it's "a love story, or a series of intertwined love stories," with Walker at the core.

A few critics thought that Auster's technique overwhelms the story, and one thought the characters uninteresting. But most agreed that Invisible is Auster's finest—and perhaps most accessible—novel to date. This is an excerpt of a review published in Bookmarks magazine. Nov 09, Franziska rated it it was amazing Shelves: readings. It was the perfect book for a lazy sunday. Doing nothing but reading and drinking coffee. I enjoyed it so much that I read it in one sitting. So was looking forward to reading his latest work.

In true Auster style, he provides a master class in creating amazingly descriptive narration. Auster cleverly gets his main character to write his own autobiography in first, second and third person voices. In the fourth and last part of the book, the main character is replaced by two other characters who complete the story. The story takes place over a period of forty years, and therefore some facts get distorted over time. I absolutely hated the disturbing and graphically described incestuous relationship that takes place. This sexual relationship between the main character and his sister is repulsive.

The story is very tiresome and gets lost due to Auster being overly ingenious, swapping the perspective of the narrator in each part of the book; which he does very well. What ensues is prototypical Auster, with switchbacks in plotting that throw into question the nature of his principal characters, even that of the good and by now former poet with the Edenic name at the center of the novel.

Besides murder we may have a case of incest as well, between Adam and his sister, Gwyn, a beauty who possessed "the face that launched a thousand hopes. Told in the form of a memoir, covering the jolting events of his life in his days as a Columbia student, and an aborted year abroad in Paris , Adam's tale does not come to us complete or unadulterated: struggling with his writing, he has mailed parts of it to a former Columbia classmate, a now-famous novelist named James Freeman, asking for advice.

It is through Freeman's largesse that we read Adam's composition, as unexpected events leave Freeman trying to verify the truth of some of Adam's claims. He even upgrades the last portion of Adam's book, crafting full sentences from the author's fragmentary notes. Is this original sin? Freeman assures us that "despite my editorial involvement with the text," in the deepest sense as storytelling, the final section of the book "was written by Walker himself. Freeman's light investigative travels to Oakland, where Walker lives, and to Paris and his conversations with Gwyn greatly complicate the fervor of youth that permeates Adam's version of events: moral indignation on the one hand and forbidden but unabashed joy on the other.

He is recounting the time of his student sojourn in Paris, but nearly his entire story has been put forth in that spirit too, including the preceding section, "Summer," which detailed a monthlong affair with his sister when he was